India’s first naval offensive and the man who headed it


About 50 years ago, on December 4, 1971, during the India-Pakistan war, when the Indian Air Force and Indian Army were mounting an offensive on the ground and in the air, a master plan was devised and carried out by the Indian Navy that became its first full-scale engagement after Independence. The victory on December 4 is celebrated as Navy Day.

The Indian Navy engaged in action against the Pakistan navy on the western front, the year in which hostilities started on the eastern front due to the Bangladesh Liberation War. Named Operation Trident, the plan of the Indian Navy was to block the Pakistani ports. India ended up inflicting heavy damage on Pakistani ships and the harbour of Karachi.

At the heart of this mission was Commodore K P Gopal Rao from Tamil Nadu. He was heading the Arnala class anti-submarine corvettes INS Kiltan and INS Katchall. Deputed at the eastern naval coast at the time, he was called to join the western fleet to head the task group that launched the attack on the Karachi port by the chief of naval staff Admiral S M Nanda.





Source link

Norway takes delivery of Boeing P-8 submarine-hunter aircraft


SEATTLE (Reuters) -Norway took delivery on Thursday of the first of five Boeing Co P-8 maritime patrol aircraft, central to the NATO country’s ability to expand its submarine-hunting capabilities in the strategic “High North” area inside the Arctic Circle.

The five aircraft will replace the Royal Norwegian Air Force’s current fleet of six Lockheed Martin Corp P-3 Orions and two Dassault Aviation DA-20 Jet Falcons.

The fleet will expand Norway’s maritime capabilities as it sees Russia “fielding some incredibly capable maritime assets,” Major General Odd-Harald Hagen, Norway’s defense attache, said before a ribbon-cutting ceremony on a rain-slicked Boeing Field.

“With a much more assertive Russia in the High North, in the Atlantic, and with a more forward-leaning Russian posture, we are returning to near-peer competition also in the maritime domain,” Hagen said.

Norway will spend roughly 11 billion kroner ($1.25 billion) on the P-8 aircraft, including additional equipment and support, a Norwegian official said. They will be operated at Norway’s Evenes Air Station inside the Arctic Circle

For Boeing, the delivery underscores the importance of its defense business as the U.S. planemaker works to recoup billions of dollars from the overlapping coronavirus and 737 MAX safety crises.

The anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare, surveillance and reconnaissance P-8 is based on Boeing’s 737-800 next- generation commercial jetliner.

Boeing has plans to reduce its monthly production rate of 737-based military derivatives to one aircraft a month from 1.5 beginning in April, the company said on Thursday, citing demand and other factors.

Deliveries to New Zealand, South Korea and Germany will take place in 2022, 2023 and 2024, respectively, Boeing said.

The remaining four P-8 aircraft for Norway were in “advanced stages of production” and will be delivered in 2022, Boeing said.

As ice caps recede and a broader swath of the Arctic Ocean is more navigable, Norway and other European nations have seen the need to improve sub-hunting and other capabilities to support the NATO mission.

(Reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle and Mike Stone in Washington; Editing by Cynthia Osterman and Peter Cooney)



Source link

USS Connecticut: How did a $3 billion US Navy submarine hit an undersea mountain?


The Connecticut is now pierside at a US Navy base on the Pacific island of Guam. The Navy says it got there — more than 1,800 miles (2,900 kilometers) east of the South China Sea — under its own power and its nuclear reactor was not harmed, although 11 of its crew of suffered minor injuries in the collision.

The Pentagon has not released details of the damage the vessel incurred nor how long it might be out of action in a region which, with the rise of the Chinese navy, is seeing growing demands on the US fleet.

Which leaves US military planners with some big questions to answer in the coming weeks and months.

Not the least of which is, how did this happen?

Driving a submarine

The Navy on Thursday gave a hint of what might have led to the accident when it relieved the Connecticut’s leadership of their command due to loss of confidence.

The commanding officer, Cmdr. Cameron Aljilani, was relieved of duty, as were the executive officer, Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Cashin, and the chief of the boat, Master Chief Sonar Technician Cory Rodgers.

Vice Adm. Karl Thomas, commander of US 7th Fleet, determined that “sound judgment, prudent decision-making and adherence to required procedures in navigation planning, watch team execution and risk management could have prevented the incident,” according to a statement about the decision.

The undersea environment is unforgiving and even small mistakes can have huge consequences.

“Submarining is hard, it’s really hard. Not everything goes right all the time,” said Thomas Shugart, who spent more than 11 years on US submarines, including commanding an attack sub.

Members of the crew sit at the controls aboard the Seawolf-class attack submarine USS Jimmy Carter in 2005.

Surface ships or a sub operating at periscope depth can relay on global positioning satellites to give sailors a very accurate location, said Shugart, now an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security.

But at depth, the GPS systems are not available. Submariners use their compasses and charts.

Accurate charts (with a resolution of 328 feet or 100 meters) of the sea bottom are compiled by sending surface ships over an area and bathing the bottom in sound waves — a method called multi-beam sonar.

But the process is expensive and time consuming, leaving as much as 80% of Earth’s seafloor unmapped.

In the busy South China Sea, through which a third of the world’s maritime trade passes and where China has been building and militarily fortifying man-made islands, less than 50% of the sea bottom has been mapped, David Sandwell, a professor of geophysics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California, told CNN.

“It’s not surprising that you could run into something,” he said.

The US Navy has not said exactly where the Connecticut hit the seamount.

Officially, the service says it was in Indo-Pacific waters, but US defense officials had previously told CNN it occurred in the South China Sea.

Sandwell tried to narrow down the area.

Using a method called vertical gravity grading — taking satellite altimetry measurements of the Earth’s gravitational field — and overlaying those results with mapping of the bottom of the South China Sea, he was able to identify 27 places where the Connecticut could have hit a seamount that was not on US Navy charts.

“These are places where the gravity predicts there is something shallower than 400 meters (1,312 feet), around the depth where a submarine might run into it,” he said.

Officially, the Navy says Seawolf-class subs have a maximum depth of more than 243 meters (800 feet), although some experts put their maximum depth around double that.

Submarines do have their own sonar, but using it comes at a price — loss of stealthiness.

Those sonar pings — so ubiquitous in submarine movies — also give away the sub’s position to opposing forces.

“Sonar is your only way to look at the bottom, but you don’t want to put out more sound than you have to,” Shugart said.

“You’d have to do that about every 20 seconds or so,” to get an accurate picture, Sandwell said. “It makes a lot of noise.”

When it comes to knowing the terrain beneath them, even astronauts might have it easier than submariners, according to Shugart.

“Basically, the surface of the moon is better charted than the bottom of the ocean is,” he said.

A history of submarine groundings

The USS Connecticut isn’t the first US Navy sub to be involved in an underwater collision.
The attack submarine USS San Francisco sits in dry dock, on January 27, 2005, in Apra Harbor, Guam to assess damage sustained after running aground approximately 350 miles south of Guam on January 8, 2005.

On January 8, 2005, the USS San Francisco, a Los Angeles-class attack submarine, struck a seamount about 350 miles (563 kilometers) south of Guam in the Pacific Ocean.

The incident killed one sailor and injured 97 others among the crew of 137.

A Navy investigation concluded the San Francisco was traveling at maximum speed at a depth of 525 feet (160 meters) when it hit the seamount, which was not on the chart the sub’s commanders were using at the time.

But the probe found the commanders should have known the undersea mountain was there based on other charts in their possession, which indicated a navigational hazard in the area.

“If San Francisco’s leaders and watchteams had complied with requisite procedures and exercised prudent navigation practices, the grounding would most likely have been avoided,” the Navy report said. “Even if not wholly avoided, however, the grounding would not have been as severe and loss of life may be been prevented.”

Other incidents have been less serious but illustrate the difficulties of maneuvering subs even in familiar waters.

For instance, in November 2015, the USS Georgia, an Ohio-class guided missile submarine, struck a channel buoy and grounded as it was returning to port in Kings Bay, Georgia.
The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Georgia departs Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in 2015.

The 18,000-ton, 560-foot-long (170 meters) sub sustained more than $1 million in damage and its captain was relieved of command.

And in 2003, the USS Hartford ran aground while entering a NATO base in Spain, resulting in a $9 million repair bill and its commander being relieved of duty.

Despite those incidents, Shugart, the former US Navy sub commander, defends the US Navy’s record under the sea.

“We have more submarines, they spend more time at sea, they go a lot farther away from home and they operate at higher speeds than probably anybody else’s,” he said.

“We do the most challenging submarine missions that anybody does and the farthest away from home,” he said, adding: “even the pros have bad days.”

What makes the USS Connecticut so special?

The Connecticut is one of three Seawolf-class submarines in the US Navy fleet, each costing about $3 billion to build. The 9,300-ton, 353-foot sub, commissioned in 1998 and is crewed by 140 sailors.

What are nuclear-powered submarines and how do they work?

Like all modern US Navy attack submarines, the Connecticut is powered by a nuclear reactor, which enables it to be fast but quiet, with none of the noise produced by a combustion engine. Nuclear power enables such subs to stay at sea and underwater as long as provisions for the crew hold out.

The Navy doesn’t give exact figures in publicizing the abilities of its submarine, but experts say the Seawolf-class is exceptional.

“These subs have some of the most advanced — in fact the most advanced — underwater capabilities in the business,” said Alessio Patalano, professor of war and strategy at King’s College in London.

The Navy says it is “exceptionally quiet, fast, well-armed, and equipped with advanced sensors.”

A Navy fact sheet says the Connecticut is capable of going faster than 28 mph (46.3 kph) under water. That’s faster than the average container or cargo ship on the surface of the sea and almost as fast as the US Navy’s Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.

As it is larger than even the newest Virginia-class attack subs, the Connecticut can carry more weaponry than other US attack submarines — including up to 50 torpedoes as well as Tomahawk cruise missiles, according to a US Navy fact sheet.

The USS Connecticut was commissioned in Groton, Connecticut on December 11, 1998.

And despite being more than 20 years old, it’s also technologically advanced with updates to its systems performed during its service life.

Though the Navy doesn’t give details on the missions its submarines undertake, the three Seawolf-class subs are thought to be important intelligence-gathering assets, especially in shallower environments.

“The robust design of the Seawolf class enables these submarines to perform a wide spectrum of crucial military assignments — from underneath the Arctic icepack to littoral regions anywhere in the world,” the manufacturer, General Dynamics Electric Boat, says on its website.

“Their missions include surveillance, intelligence collection, special warfare, cruise missile strike, mine warfare, and anti-submarine and anti-surface ship warfare,” Electric Boat says.

With no combat taking place in the South China Sea, the focus of the sub in the current environment is likely to be in intelligence gathering.

And that’s why China is paying close attention.

The  guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain, rear, and the Royal Australian Navy  frigate HMAS Ballarat sail together during integrated operations in the South China Sea in October 2020.

Questions from Beijing

Following the collision, Beijing has accused Washington of not being forthcoming about what happened and how it could affect countries around the South China Sea.

“We have repeatedly expressed our grave concern over the incident and asked the US side to take a responsible attitude and provide a detailed clarification so as to give a satisfactory account to the international community and countries in the region,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said this week.

The subject of nuclear-powered submarines has been prominent in Chinese state media over the past few months in the wake of Australia’s decision to acquire such vessels from the United States and the United Kingdom under a deal known as AUKUS.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said in September the AUKUS deal “seriously damages regional peace and stability.”

The Connecticut incident just added fuel to Beijing’s propaganda push.

Washington issued its first public statement on the collision five days after it occurred. It did not disclose the fact that the Connecticut hit a seamount until earlier this week, nearly a month after the incident.

US Navy officials told CNN on Wednesday the delays stemmed from concerns including keeping the damaged sub safe and ensuring a thorough investigation of the incident, as is standard.

“Due to operations security, we could not disclose the location of the submarine or the incident to the public at an earlier date,” Cmdr. Hayley Sims, a public affairs officer for the US 7th Fleet, said in an email.

Sims said two internal investigations were launched, one on the command of the sub and a second on safety procedures.

Analysis: Why Russian and Chinese warships teaming up to circle Japan is a big deal

The first, she said, “determined USS Connecticut grounded on an uncharted seamount while operating in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region” and has been submitted to 7th Fleet commanders for review.

The second probe, being conducted by Submarine Force, US Pacific Fleet in Hawaii, is ongoing.

A spokesperson for the sub force, Cmdr. Cindy Fields, told CNN this week the submarine is in “a safe and stable condition” at the port in Guam.

“USS Connecticut’s nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational,” she said.

The Navy said Thursday the Connecticut would be moved to Bremerton, Washington, for repairs.

According to a report by the state-run Xinhua news agency, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang called on Washington to clarify “the intended navigation of the nuclear submarine, whether the specific location of the incident was in an exclusive economic zone or territorial sea of any other country, or whether the incident has caused nuclear leakage or damaged the marine environment.”

The US has not revealed any of those details, but when it comes to the South China Sea, Washington’s policy is consistent.

After a US destroyer performed a freedom of navigation operation in the waterway in September, a US 7th Fleet statement responded definitively to Chinese objections: “The United States will continue to fly, sail, and operate wherever international law allows,” the statement said. “Nothing (China) says otherwise will deter us.”

CNN’s Oren Liebermann and Barbara Starr contributed to this report.



Source link

Latest US military hypersonic test fails


A booster stack, which is the rocket used to accelerate the projectile to hypersonic speeds, failed and the test of the projectile, the hypersonic glide body, could not proceed, the statement said.

Because the rocket failed the Pentagon was not able to test the hypersonic glide body, which is the key component needed to develop a hypersonic weapon.

Officials have started a review of the test, which took place Thursday at the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska, to understand the cause of the booster failure.

“Experiments and tests — both successful and unsuccessful — are the backbone of developing highly complex, critical technologies at tremendous speed, as the department is doing with hypersonic technologies,” said Lt. Cdr. Tim Gorman, a Pentagon spokesman, in a statement.

The Pentagon has made developing hypersonic weapons one of its top priorities, particularly as China and Russia are working to develop their own versions. The failure is another blow to the US effort following a failed test in April and comes days after it was reported that China had successfully tested a hypersonic glide vehicle.

Traveling at Mach 5 or faster, hypersonic weapons are difficult to detect, posing a challenge to missile defense systems. Hypersonic missiles can travel at a far lower trajectory than high-arcing ballistic missiles, which can be easily detectable. Hypersonics can also maneuver and evade missile defense systems.

Reports of successful Chinese and Russian test

Over the weekend, the Financial Times reported that China had successfully tested a hypersonic glide vehicle capable of carrying a nuclear weapon. They reported the glide vehicle was launched from an orbital bombardment system. Though China denied the report, saying on Monday that the test was instead a “routine spacecraft experiment.

Defense officials say they are particulary concerned about China developing hypersonic capabilities because they could enable Beijing to launch an attack over the South Pole, evading US missile defenses, which are generally geared toward missiles coming over the North Pole.

Two weeks ago, Russia claimed to have successfully tested a submarine-launched hypersonic missile for the first time, dubbed the Tsirkon. Earlier this summer, Russia said it had fired the same missile from a warship.

Nevertheless, the Pentagon insists it remains on track to deliver offensive hypersonic weapons in the early 2020s, a timeline that seems more urgent with the advances in hypersonic technology shown off by the Russians and Chinese.

“This flight test is part of an ongoing series of flight tests as we continue to develop this technology,” Gorman said.

The failed test of a hypersonic glide body occurred after the Navy and Army earlier this week conducted a series of successful hypersonic measurement tests highlighting the Pentagon’s priority of rapidly researching and testing the weapon system. The three joint sounding tests were designed to collect data and carry out hypersonic experiments from DoD partners involved in developing the advanced weapons.

US Air Force test to launch ultra-fast hypersonic missile fails

“These launches allow for frequent and regular flight testing opportunities to support rapid maturation of offensive and defensive hypersonic technologies,” the Navy said in a statement about the trials.

Those tests, carried out at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, provide data for the development of the services’ hypersonic weapons, including the Navy’s Conventional Prompt Strike and the Army’s Long Range Hypersonic Weapon.

The US is focusing on conventional hypersonic weapons that are based on ships, land and air platforms.

In April, the Air Force’s hypersonic missile program suffered a setback when it failed to launch from a B-52. Instead, the AGM-183A Air-launched Rapid Response Weapon (ARRW) remained on the aircraft.



Source link

Damaged US Navy sub was operating in one of world’s most difficult undersea environments, analysts say


By Brad Lendon, CNN

The US Navy submarine that struck an underwater object in the South China Sea last weekend was operating in one of the world’s most difficult undersea environments, one filled with noise from ships above and a seabed with constantly shifting contours that can surprise any submarine crew, analysts say.

US defense officials on Thursday did not give details of the accident that befell the USS Connecticut, saying only that a number of sailors aboard were injured when the sub struck an object while running submerged in the South China Sea.

The service said the injuries were minor and the sub was making its way to the US naval base on the island of Guam under its own power.

The Connecticut is one of three Seawolf-class submarines in the Navy fleet, with a price tag of about $3 billion each. The 9,300-ton, 353-foot sub, commissioned in 1998, is powered by a single nuclear reactor and crewed by 140 sailors.

As it is larger than even the newest Virginia-class attack subs, the Connecticut can carry more weaponry than other US attack submarines — including up to 50 torpedoes as well as Tomahawk cruise missiles, according to a US Navy fact sheet.

And despite being more than 20 years old, it’s also technologically advanced with updates to its systems performed during its service life.

The Navy says it is “exceptionally quiet, fast, well-armed, and equipped with advanced sensors.”

“These subs have some of the most advanced — in fact the most advanced — underwater capabilities in the business,” said Alessio Patalano, professor of war and strategy at King’s College in London.

How did it get into trouble in the South China Sea?

While the Navy hasn’t revealed what the Connecticut struck, analysts say conditions in the South China Sea can be a challenge for the sub’s sophisticated sensors.

“It could have been an object small enough to be missed by sonars in a noisy environment,” Patalano said.

According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, naval vessels use what is called “passive sonar” to detect objects in the water around them. Unlike “active sonar,” which sends out pings and then registers how long their echoes take to return to the vessel, passive sonar detects only sound coming toward it.

This enables the submarine to stay quiet and hidden from adversaries, but it means subs must rely on other devices or multiple passive sonars to triangulate the location of an object in its path.

Because the South China Sea is one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes and fishing areas, all kinds of noises from vessels on the surface can mask what might pose a danger to the submarine below, analysts said.

“Depending on the place the incident occurred, noise interference of sorts (usually from traffic above) might have affected sensors, or indeed operators’ use of them,” Patalano said.

And it’s not just shipping that can pose problems for a submarine in the South China Sea, said Carl Schuster, a former US Navy captain and past director of operations at the US Pacific Command’s Joint Intelligence Center.

“It is an area with a very poor acoustic environment,” Schuster said, with even the nature of the waters themselves creating problems.

“Ambient noise from currents passing between the islands and inconsistent water conditions affect acoustic reception,” he added.

It’s also possible that something from below could have caused a problem, Schuster said.

“Those waters’ environment and the sea bottom are in a state of slow but inexorable change,” Schuster said. “It is an area that requires constant bottom contour mapping. You can hit an uncharted underwater mountain down there.

“That’s why the countries in that region, the US and China are constantly surveying and patrolling them.”

The accident was the second involving a submarine in the region this year. In April, an Indonesian submarine sank in the Bali Strait, killing all 53 crew aboard.

Indonesian Navy officials said the accident was caused by “a natural/environment factor,” but did not give further details.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.



Source link

S. Korea signs deal with Daewoo Shipbuilding to build new submarine


SEOUL, Sept. 10 (Yonhap) — The arms procurement agency said Friday it has signed a 985.7 billion won (US$853 million) deal with Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co. to build a new 3,600-ton-class submarine with improved defense capabilities.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration signed the contract Thursday for the second unit of three Changbogo-III Batch-II class submarines that South Korea plans to build by 2029. Construction of the first unit began just last month.

Carrying 50 crewmembers aboard, the 89-meter-long and 9.6-meter-wide submarine will be equipped with improved combat capabilities to better detect and target enemies and partially powered by a lithium battery, the agency said.

It will be designed with nearly 80 percent of its component parts made locally.

The deal comes a month after the Navy received the country’s first 3,000-ton-class indigenous submarine, Dosan Ahn Chang-ho, capable of firing submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs).

The Dosan Ahn Chang-ho, also constructed by Daewoo Shipbuilding, was the first of three 3,000-ton-class submarines South Korea plans to build by 2023.

“With world-class capabilities, the new submarine will play a key role as a strategic asset of our country to counter security threats from all directions,” R. Adm. Jeon Yong-kyu heading the submarine project at the agency said.



Source link

The secret behind the atom bomb, Part II


We continue the amazing broader history of gaseous diffusion as envisioned by Gordon Fee and prepared by Steve Polston, who was at one time the manager of the Paducah (Ky.) Gaseous Diffusion Plant and now retired. Steve agreed to help and took on the task of producing a draft document. We also included Jim Rushton, Ralph Donnelly, John Shoemaker, and finally, an exceptional writer who has expertise taking technical information and editing it into language the public can better understand, Alan Brown.

Part I of this column was published last week.

This shows the small size of nuclear fuel pellets.

***

Gaseous Diffusion Helped End WWII

During World War II, President Roosevelt assigned the atomic bomb project to the Army Corps of Engineers, which had a huge budget and could conceal the bomb’s development costs and progress from U.S. enemies. It was named the Manhattan project because the Corps of Engineers’ District in charge of the project was located in the Manhattan borough of New York City.



Source link

DANIEL DONOVAN Obituary (2021) – Washington, DC


DONOVAN Daniel Emmett Donovan CAPT. USN (Ret.) Daniel Emmett Donovan, 89, Captain, U.S. Navy (Retired), passed away suddenly on August 9, 2021 at the BayWoods retirement community in Annapolis, MD after a lifetime of love and service to his family, country, friends and community. Born in Oil City, PA to the late Dorothy and Emmett Donovan, Daniel and his family later moved to Hershey, PA where they planted deep roots that live on to this day. In 1954, Dan graduated from the University of South Carolina and received a commission through the NROTC program. He went on to serve a 28-year distinguished naval career that included working for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in Northwood, England in 1967, where he helped oversee and coordinate U.S. and allied submarine operations. In 1968, Dan took command of the fast attack diesel submarine USS Darter (SS 576), operating from Charleston, SC. Here, the submarine earned the Navy’s Battle “E” designation for excellence, and Dan formed strong bonds with sailors and fellow officers who cherished him. Another career highlight came in 1978, when Dan took command of the Naval Communication Area Master Station for the Atlantic Area in Norfolk, VA, which facilitated radio message traffic to and from naval vessels on the East coast and overseas sites from Iceland and Scotland to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. For this role, Dan was awarded the Navy’s Legion of Merit medal. Upon Navy retirement in 1982, Dan began a career in the communications industry, primarily with ARINC Research Corporation in Annapolis. Dan and his beloved wife, Joan, moved to the Gingerville community in Edgewater, MD where they started a new chapter and became active in helping others, primarily through St. Mary’s Parish. Together, they led an Adult Bible Study group; later Dan became a Lay Minister to provide outreach to the Jennifer Road Detention Center prisoner program, which he did for 22 years. Dan and Joan served on many Gingerville committees; helped with social events and sponsored many U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen, who they adored. In 1997, Dan founded his own communications consulting firm, D2/C2 Communications, and consulted for ARINC and other firms until he fully retired in 2008. In his free time, Dan wrote and self-published a three-book series of children’s stories featuring PueDy, a friendly skunk with a magical tail. Copies have been sold locally in Annapolis bookstores. In 2015, Dan and Joan moved to BayWoods of Annapolis, where Dan served on many committees, assisted with Catholic worship services and made many beloved friends. Dan’s favorite activity was spending time with his grandkids; from weekly phone calls to organizing family reunions, dressing up as Santa for their preschool to attending music and sports performances, he took every opportunity to support them. Dan was also an ardent supporter of US Naval Academy football and loved watching sports of all kinds. He maintained a positive outlook and supported his wife and family through the most difficult of times. He set an example focused on love, loyalty, courage and education and became a father and grandfather figure to many. Dan is survived by his children, Daniel G. (Janet) Donovan of Camp Hill, PA, Patrick (Jody) Donovan of Panama City Beach, FL, Elizabeth (Keith) Sappington of Riva, MD; his sister-in-law, Janet (Jack) Hetherington of Phoenix, AZ; his eight grandchildren, Kate (Steven) McCord, Jackie (Kyle) Sullivan, Bridget (Derek) Bonnette, Molly, Meredith and Mia Grace Donovan, Anna and James Sappington and one great-grandson, Henry McCord. Dan was preceded in death by his wife, Joan; his older sister, Therese Donovan Pollard and his granddaughter, Megan Dorothy Donovan. A memorial Mass of the Resurrection will be offered on Tuesday, August 17 at 10:30 a.m. at St. John Neumann Catholic Church, 620 Bestgate Rd., Annapolis, MD. A reception will follow at the church social hall and interment will be at 1:45 p.m. at the Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville, MD. Condolences may be made online at: www.KalasFuneralHomes.com www.KalasFuneralHomes.com

Published by The Washington Post on Aug. 13, 2021.



Source link

Timeline of USS Indianapolis, discovered in 2017 at depth of 18,000 ft


Flashback: Veteran Richard Stephens, a survivor of the USS Indianapolis sinking in 1945, left, talks with actor Nicolas Cage on the set of "USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage" in Mobile, Ala. Al.com photo/Sharon Steinmann

Editors note: The USA TODAY Network’s South Region chronicled the stories of Tennessee families still mourning the loss of loved ones on the USS Indianapolis — more than seven decades later. You can find our premium story here. 

November 7, 1931 – The USS Indianapolis was launched. The Portland-class heavy cruiser was 610 feet, 3 inches long and displaced 9,950 tons. The Indianapolis carried a main battery of nine 8-inch guns and eight 5-inch antiaircraft guns. She could reach speeds of more than 32 knots thanks to eight boilers turning four steam turbines.

The USS Indianapolis was torpedoed by the Japanese on July 30, 1945. File photo

January 1, 1933 – President Franklin D. Roosevelt selected the Indianapolis as his ship of state. She carried Roosevelt on three cruises, including his 1936 “Good Neighbor” trip to South America. 

February 20 and March 10, 1942 – The cruiser earned her first battle star during the Bougainville Air Action and Salamaua-Lae Raid. 

The bell of the USS Indianapolis is rung during the 2019 Indianapolis Veterans Day Service, held at the Indiana War Memorial on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. The service was moved inside due to inclement weather.

1943 – The U.S.S. Indianapolis became the flagship of the U.S. Fifth Fleet under Vice Admiral Raymond Spruance.

May 1943 – April 1945 – The vessel earned nine more battle stars: at Attu Occupation, which was part of the broader Aleutians Operation; the Gilbert Islands Operation; the Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls and the Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll, which were part of the Marshall Islands Operation; the Palau, Yap, Ulitihi and Woleai Raids; the Marianas Operation, including the Capture and Occupation of Saipan and Guam and the Battle of the Philippine Sea; the Capture and Occupation of Tinian Island; the Capture and Occupation of the Southern Palau Islands during the Western Caroline Islands Operation; for her part in the bombardment of Iwo Jima; for her role in the Okinawa Gunto Operation.



Source link