Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice



Video: Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice

The Los Angeles class fast-attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) surfacing in the Arctic Ocean in support of Ice Exercise (ICEX). ICEX is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations.
(U.S. Navy video by Chief Darryl I. Wood/Released)

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This Is How America's Nuclear-Submarine get Resupplied at Sea



The U.S. Navy just tested a new delivery system for supplying submarines while underway at sea—by drone. In a video released by the Navy, a large quadcopter-type drone seen hovering above the deck of a ballistic-missile submarine. A small payload, not much larger than a small backpack, dangled from a line attached to the drone. Despite the gentle rolling of the submarine’s hull, the drone successfully made the drop. The video description read:

“An unmanned aerial vehicle delivers a payload to the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN-730) around the Hawaiian Islands. Underway replenishment sustains the fleet anywhere/anytime. This event was designed to test and evaluate the tactics, techniques, and procedures of U.S. Strategic Command’s expeditionary logistics and enhance the overall readiness of our strategic forces.”

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What's Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy



Video: What’s Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy

The Ohio Class submarine is the fourth biggest in the world. The US Navy operates 18 Ohio class nuclear-powered submarines, which are the biggest submarines ever built for the US. Each sub has a submerged displacement of 18,750t.

The first submarine of the class, USS Ohio was built by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton. It was commissioned into service in November 1981. All the other submarines were named after the US States, except USS Henry M. Jackson, which was named after a US senator.

Each Ohio Class submarine has a length of 170m, a 13m beam and a 10.8m draught. The gliding speed on the surface is 12kt and underwater is 20kt. The submarine class includes one S8G pressurised water reactor, two geared turbines, one auxiliary 242kW diesel motor and one shaft with a seven-bladed screw.

The submarine is capable of carrying 24 Trident missiles. The armament also includes four 53cm Mark 48 torpedo tubes.

Video by Austin Rooney, Petty Officer 1st Class Jeffrey Richardson, Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Hinton, Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Lee
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Fast Attack Submarine Operations At Naval Base Guam (2020)



U.S. Navy, Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15 (CSS-15), transit Apra Harbor, moor pierside and depart Naval Base Guam during operations in 2020. CSS-15 currently consists of four Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines: USS Key West, SSN 722 — USS Oklahoma City, SSN 723 — USS Topeka, SSN 754 — USS Asheville, SSN 758.

Film Credits: U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger and Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jordyn Diomede, Commander Submarine Squadron 15

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Funny Submarine Rules Keep Sailors Sane



How do you keep up morale on a Navy submarine submerged for days under the polar ice cap? Rules-some serious, some not so much. WSJ’s Julian Barnes reports from the USS New Mexico during its recent deployment in the Arctic Ocean.

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