DVIDS – News – 28 Chief Petty Officers Promoted at USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park



Twenty-eight new chief petty officers from Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Naval Submarine Training Center Pacific, Submarine Readiness Squadron 33, USS Tucson (SSN 770), USS Hawaii (SSN 776), USS North Carolina (SSN 777) and USS Minnesota (SSN 783) were promoted during a pinning ceremony held at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Oct. 21.

The ceremony was the culmination to chief’s initiation, commonly referred to as “chief season” during which chief-selects completed six weeks of education and training to enhance their leadership styles and prepare them for the challenges of being a U.S. Navy chief petty officer, as outlined by the Chief Petty Officer Creed. Unique to the Navy, being a chief petty officer marks a career milestone that comes with responsibilities unlike any other position.

“Being a chief petty officer means you are expected to lead up, down and laterally. Chiefs are in a unique position to mentor and train Sailors under their charge, with the goal of making them better than we were in their shoes,” said Force Master Chief Jason Avin, Force Master Chief, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. “However, chiefs are also expected to mentor junior officers and aid in their development as well as continuously accept the responsibility of teaching and learning from every chief in the Mess. The final six weeks of initiation season are used not only to focus selectees on what the Chief Petty Officer Creed means, but also to Get Real and Get Better through honest self-assessment and teamwork.”

Navy chiefs are expected to not only maintain in-rate technical expertise that exceeds that of any other Sailor, but also to stand ready to handle challenges ranging from their Sailors’ administrative issues to their professional development. Navy chiefs are deckplate leaders who bridge the gap between officers and enlisted personnel, filling a role that could be done by no other.

Being promoted to the rank of chief petty officer represents not only a significant achievement in any Sailor’s career, but also formally recognizes the family members, shipmates, and friends who have supported and helped each of these Sailors achieve this milestone.

“Today, you enter an entirely new level of leadership and responsibility — and it will be one of the most rewarding aspects of your career. It’s your turn to … BE THE CHIEF, to wear the anchors and the khaki uniform, to shoulder the responsibility and burdens of leadership, to always be ready to answer the call, and to carry forward our Navy’s highest traditions.” said Rear Adm. Jeff Jablon, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet.







Date Taken: 10.21.2022
Date Posted: 10.21.2022 21:39
Story ID: 431841
Location: PEARL HARBOR, HI, US 






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DVIDS – News – USS Alabama Conducts Crew Change at Sea



U.S. Navy story by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brian G. Reynolds, Submarine Group Nine Public Affairs

NAVAL BASE KITSAP-BANGOR, Wash. (May 24, 2022) – The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alabama (SSBN 731) conducted a full crew change while at sea that concluded May 24, 2022.

This previously uncommon underway change of crew demonstrates how the Navy and its strategic forces have evolved to think, act, and operate differently in order to meet deterrent mission tasking while simultaneously executing necessary ship lifecycle events.

“This event demonstrated our ability to completely change out the crew of an SSBN at sea and in a location of our choosing,” said Rear Adm. Robert M. Gaucher, commander Submarine Group 9 and Task Group 114.3. “The readiness and flexibility we demonstrated today adds another layer of uncertainty to adversary efforts to monitor our SSBN force, and continues to send a strong message to our adversaries that ‘Today is not the day.’”

Each ballistic missile submarine has two crews, a blue crew and a gold crew, which alternate manning. Previously, the crews would alternate and resupply between patrols while in port. The ability to change crews while underway adds a new dynamic of flexibility and sustainability while the submarine is executing their mission.

“This provides an opportunity to keep the nuclear deterrent at sea survivable by exchanging the crews and replenishing the ship’s supplies in any port or location across the world,” said Capt. Kelly Laing, director of maritime operations at Commander, Task Group 114.3. “Our SSBNs are no longer tied to their homeport of record or another naval port to keep them at sea, ensuring that we are always executing the deterrent mission for the U.S. and our allies.”

Alabama is one of eight Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor and the eighth U.S. Navy ship to bear the name. The class is designed for extended, undetectable deterrent patrols and as a launch platform for intercontinental ballistic missiles.





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DVIDS – News – SUBLANT Announces 2022 Sailors of the Year



Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic (COMSUBLANT) announced the Shore and Sea Sailors of the Year (SOY) during a ceremony aboard Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads, April 21.

Machinist’s Mate (Nuclear) 1st Class Paul Baker, Commander, Submarine Squadron Eight’s finalist, was named Submarine Force Atlantic’s (SUBLANT) Sea SOY. Yeoman 1st Class Kirk Lewis, Submarine Force Atlantic’s finalist, was named SUBLANT’s Shore SOY.

Baker, assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Newport News (SSN 750), won his boat and squadron’s SOY competition before going on to win SUBLANT’s Sea SOY. As a result of winning, he will be pinned to the rank of chief petty officer after completing this year’s Naval Chief Petty Officer Initiation.

“I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity to be selected as the Sea Sailor of the Year,” said Baker. “I was proud to represent my command and squadron. It was a great competition as all the Sailors displayed the qualities it takes to be a great leader at the next level. I look forward to seeing them in the fleet.”

Lewis, who serves as SUBLANT’s chief of staff administrative assistance, is responsible for processing flag level correspondence, travel and meeting coordination of all U.S. submarine and strategic commands.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the Shore Sailor of the Year by leadership,” said Lewis. “It means my supervisors, leaders and Sailors under me believed in me. I couldn’t have possibly got this far without them.”

Vice Adm. William Houston, commander, Submarine Forces, spoke on the finalists’ dedication and professionalism during the ceremony.

“Enlisted Sailors have always been the backbone of our Navy since its inception,” said Houston. “Seeing our finalists here today is a reminder of how committed our Sailors are to our country and carrying out the mission. This milestone shows how highly their leadership thinks of their professionalism, work ethic and dedication to duty. I am confident they will all go on to be remarkable leaders and continue to exemplify the best of our enlisted force.”

SUBLANT’s Force Master Chief Steve Bosco expressed the difficulty in selecting the Sea and Shore SOYs as all the finalists represented the very best of the forces’ enlisted Sailors.

“The finalists certainly made it difficult to pick a winner as they all displayed the very best qualities the Submarine Force has to offer,” said Bosco. “Their hard work and commitment has been recognized by leadership and they are all certainly deserving of the SOY. I am extremely proud of all of them and look forward to seeing them go on to be the next generation of the Submarine Forces’ enlisted leadership.”

As the Shore Sailor of the Year for COMSUBLANT, Lewis will compete in the 2022 Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Sailor of the Year competition.

Sailor of the Year is a time-honored tradition introduced in 1972 by Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet. This annual competition is held to recognize superior performance of individual Sailors, who best exemplify the ideals of professional Sailor throughout the fleet.

The Submarine Force executes the Department of the Navy’s mission in and from the undersea domain. In addition to lending added capacity to naval forces, the Submarine Force, in particular, is expected to leverage those special advantages that come with undersea concealment to permit operational, deterrent and combat effects that the Navy and the nation could not otherwise achieve.

The Submarine Force and supporting organizations constitute the primary undersea arm of the Navy. Submarines and their crews remain the tip of the undersea spear.







Date Taken: 04.22.2022
Date Posted: 04.22.2022 13:34
Story ID: 419070
Location: NORFOLK, VA, US 





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DVIDS – News – Undersea Warfighting Development Center holds change of command



GROTON, Connecticut – The Undersea Warfighting Development Center (UWDC) held a change of command ceremony March 25 at the Submarine Force Museum in Groton, Connecticut.

Rear Adm. Martin Muckian relieved Rear Adm. Rick Seif as the commander of UWDC, a command tasked with enhancing undersea warfighting capabilities and readiness across the theater, operational and tactical levels of war.

Rear Adm. Blake Converse, deputy commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, served as presiding officer over the ceremony. Both Seif and Muckian previously worked as chief of staff under Converse when the he held the position of commander, U.S. Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet.

“Rick and Marty represent the finest the submarine force has in senior leadership,” Converse said. “These two leaders are … gifted in the fine arts of submarining.”

Converse credited Seif with overseeing 44 tactical development exercises, which he called “tenfold what we were doing” before UWDC’s establishment in 2015. He added that he has “great peace of mind” knowing someone as exceptional as Muckian will follow in Seif’s footsteps.

Seif, who departs to become commander, Submarine Group 7 in Yokosuka, Japan, said it had been a tremendous honor to work alongside the innovative warfighters of UWDC.

UWDC is tasked with enhancing undersea warfighting capabilities and readiness across the theater, operational and tactical levels of war. The nearly seven-year-old Groton-based center, with detachments in Norfolk and San Diego, develops doctrine for how multi-domain undersea warfare platforms integrate with each other, including the incorporation of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

In his approximately two years at UWDC, Seif oversaw the growth of the center’s Aggressor Squadron (AGGRON), popularly referred to as the Navy’s “Top Gun for Submariners,” referring to the fighter pilot training program made famous in a 1986 Hollywood blockbuster.

“The UWDC team is on the cutting edge of undersea warfare tactics and technology integration. They are true professionals, patriots, and warfighters, and it’s been a tremendous honor to work alongside them,” said Seif, a Pittsburgh native. “Our multi-domain undersea forces play an integral role in our nation’s joint warfighting readiness, and UWDC’s work is critical to our enduring asymmetric advantage in this critically important mission area.”

Seif, a 1992 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, has served aboard five nuclear-powered, Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines, including as commanding officer of USS Buffalo (SSN 715) and USS Jacksonville (SSN 699).

“Whether working on artificial intelligence, unmanned systems, cross-domain command and control, tactics, or Arctic operations, every member of the UWDC has knocked it out of the park,” said Seif. “I will miss this team, but I know they will thrive and grow under the leadership of Marty Muckian. I look forward to watching UWDC’s continued success in the years ahead.”

Muckian, a native of Elmhurst, Illinois, takes command after most recently serving as chief of staff, Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. He is a 1995 graduate of the University of Illinois. He previously served as commander, Submarine Squadron 6, Norfolk, Va.

“I am honored to assume command of the Navy’s flagship for undersea tactical development, warfighting doctrine and integration,” said Muckian. “This team is at the forefront of ensuring the United States Navy remains the pre-eminent undersea warfighting force.”

The UWDC mission is to lead undersea superiority, enabling decisive effects from or in the undersea domain when and where the operational commander directs.







Date Taken: 03.25.2022
Date Posted: 03.25.2022 14:08
Story ID: 417183
Location: GROTON, CT, US 





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