US Navy Sixth Fleet Commander Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee, and P-8A Poseidon arrives Nigeria – Military Africa


The United States Navy has deployed it’s P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft to Nigeria to participate in the Obangame Express 2023 (OE23) martime exercise.

The P-8A Poseidon MPA arrives Lagos, Nigeria on Friday, 27 January, as part of the United States contingent for OE22.

A militarized version of the Boeing 737 commercial aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon is intended to replace the U.S. Navy’s ageing P-3 Orion fleet as the service’s front-line anti-submarine warfare aircraft.

According to Boeing, the P-8 is a multi-mission maritime patrol aircraft, excelling at anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and search and rescue.

Also, Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee, the commander of the U.S. Sixth Fleet, arrived in Lagos, Nigeria for the opening ceremony of Exercise Obangame Express (OE23), the largest multinational maritime exercise in Western and Central Africa, Jan. 27, 2023.

Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee, commander of U.S. Sixth Fleet, met with Nigerian Navy leadership during his visit to the Western Naval Command during exercise Obangame Express.

📸 MC1 Cameron C. Edy
U.S. Navy U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) U.S. Navy U.S. Mission Nigeria Nigerian Navy #OE23

“The work accomplished during Obangame Express strengthens regional cooperation and trust, ensuring African nations can continue protecting their coastal resources and sovereign waters,” said Ishee.

Alongside African partners, U.S. service members also participated in practical demonstrations on combat defense tactics and life-saving medical care under fire.

U.S. Coast Guard Lt.j.g. Nicholas Didiano led a simulated vessel boarding on a Nigerian Navy small patrol craft. The demonstration rehearsed vessel entry, clearing and securing, and arrest techniques.

“The exercise is important because it allows forces to learn how to protect themselves and protect their units and boarding teams. If they encounter any kind of illicit activity, they’ll be better prepared for the risk and threat at hand,” said Didiano.

African partners found the expertise exchange and practical demonstrations helpful for operations that they conduct with their respective nations.

“This exercise is very interesting – rehearsing some methods we already know, while learning new techniques is incredibly helpful on a practical side,” said Maitre Major (MTM) Hermann Houngue, Benin Navy. “Especially the self defense techniques – you have to know them, to protect yourself, to do your job – I can’t stress how important it is in a very practical way.”

OE23, one of three U.S. Naval Forces Africa (NAVAF) – facilitated regional exercises, provides collaborative opportunities for African and U.S. forces, and international partners to address shared transnational maritime concerns. NAVAF’s ongoing maritime security cooperation with African partners focuses on overcoming the challenges of maritime safety and security in the region.

The exercise takes place across five zones in the southern Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Guinea – stretching from the West African island of Cabo Verde to the Central African shores of Angola, including the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS).

Meanwhile, two United State’s Air Force (USAF) Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker aircraft, one from the 6th Air Refueling Wing (6th ARW) at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida made a brief stop in Cape Town on Wednesday 25 January as part of an endurance mission.

The two Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker aircraft, one from the 6th Air Refueling Wing (6th ARW) at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, and Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, are on a 32 200 km endurance mission across the Southern Hemisphere, under the title of “Delivering Hope, Projecting Lethality.”



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Tokyo Protests Chinese Surveillance Ship Transit in Territorial Waters, Japan Prepares for Fleet Review


Shupang-class survey ship

A People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) survey ship vessel entered Japan’s territorial waters near islands south of Kyushu this week, according to the Japanese Ministry of Defense.

The Shupang-class survey ship was sighted sailing northeast through Japan’s contiguous zone west of Gaja Island and entered Japan’s territorial waters southwest of Kuchinoerabu Island at 12:10 a.m. local time on Wednesday. The ship departed Japan’s territorial waters after three hours of operating near Yakushima Island and sailed southeast. According to Japanese officials, the transit was the fourth intrusion of a foreign warship this year, marking a record high.

Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force fast attack craft JS Otaka (PG-826), JMSDF P-1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) from Fleet Air Wing 1 out of Kanoya Air Base, Kyushu and Fleet Air Wing 4 operating from Naval Air Facility Atusgi, Honshu, and a JMSDF P-3C Orion MPA from Fleet Air Wing 5 operating from Naha Air Base, Okinawa, monitored the PLAN ship. Japan has lodged a diplomatic protest over the incident.

On Monday, the Japanese MoD issued a statement that said on Oct. 28, a Russian Navy Balzam-class surveillance ship was sighted sailing west in an area 160 kilometers west of Cape Ryupi, Aomori Prefecture, Honshu. An image and hull number provided in the release identified the ship as Pribaltica (80), which is part of the Russian Navy Pacific Fleet. The following day, the Russian ship was sighted sailing southeast towards the Tsugaru Strait before turning around in an area 80 kilometers west of Cape Ryupi and subsequently sailing northwest into the Sea of Japan. Minesweeper JS Izushima (MSC-687) and a JMSDF P-3C Orion MPA of Fleet Air Wing 2 based at JMSDF Hachinohe Air Base, Honshu monitored the Russian ship, according to the release.

Meanwhile, a number of naval vessels are docked in Yokosuka for the JMSDF International Fleet Review (IFR), which will happen on Sunday at Sagami Bay. Australia, Brunei, Canada, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Singapore, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States will take part in the IFR. Details on the U.S. participation have not yet been disclosed, but the following list of ships are currently docked at Yokosuka, according to ship spotters:

https://twitter.com/US7thFleet/status/1587711061326716933

  • Australia: Destroyer HMAS Hobart (DDG39), frigate HMAS Arunta (FFH151) and submarine HMAS Farncomb (SSG74)
  • Brunei: Offshore patrol vessel KDB Darulehsan (07)
  • Canada: Frigates HMCS Vancouver (FFH331) and HMCS Winnipeg (FFH338)
  • India: Frigate INS Shivalik (F47) and corvette INS Kamorta (P28)
  • Indonesia: Corvette KRI Diponegoro (365)
  • Malaysia: Next generation patrol vessel KD Kelantan (PV175)
  • New Zealand: Replenishment ship HMNZS Aotearoa (A11)
  • Pakistan: Frigate PNS Shamsheer (FFG-252) and replenishment ship PNS Nasr (A47)
  • Republic of Korea: Fast combat support ship ROKS Soyang (AOE-51)
  • Thailand: Frigate HTMS Bhumibol Adulyadej (FFG471)
  • Singapore: Frigate RSS Formidable (68)

U.K. patrol vessel HMAS Tamar (P233) is also taking part in the fleet review. Submarine Farncomb was originally scheduled to take part in the Rim of the Pacific exercise in Hawaii over the summer, but maintenance issues caused the submarine to miss the it, according to Australian media reports. The submarine did deploy to Hawaii at the end of RIMPAC and conducted bilateral training there before heading to Japan.

Several ships have wrapped up deployments to the Indo-Pacific recently. USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) arrived home on Monday in Honolulu following an 83-day, 16,000 nautical-mile deployment to the Western Pacific, which began in August. The national security cutter operated under the tactical control of U.S. Navy 7th Fleet, according to a Coast Guard news release.

Midgett’s crew executed numerous cooperative engagements, professional exchanges, and capacity building efforts with naval allies and partners, who included the Philippine Coast Guard, Singapore Maritime Security Response Flotilla, the Information Fusion Center, Police Coast Guard, Indian Coast Guard, and Maldives National Defense Force.” the release reads.

USS Chicago (SSN 721) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a deployment in U.S. 7th Fleet on Nov. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

On Wednesday, USS Chicago (SSN-721) returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam following a seven-month deployment that began on March 28. It was the submarine’s final deployment before decommissioning, which is scheduled for 2023 following 37 years of service, according to a U.S. Navy news release.





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The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of



The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of

While nuclear power seems for many to be a fairly modern innovation, research on nuclear marine propulsion started way back in the 1940’s. In fact, the first nuclear-powered submarine took its maiden voyage in 1955. Since then, the tech, range, power and capabilities of these nuclear vessels have improved exponentially. So, what is the latest in the world of nuclear-powered marine vessels and what can we predict on the horizon?

In this episode we are going to learn all about the latest generation of nuclear-powered ships and take a guess on what leaps we’ll make in the future.

So, let’s get into it!

#Submarine #US #Navy

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What does the U.S. Navy Submarine fleet comprise of?



The submarine fleet community is a small but deadly force which delivers a major impact and provides unique capabilities to operational commanders around the world. As the maritime security environment has evolved into an asymmetrical warfighting scenario, the world faces new weapons systems that can threaten our joint forces at over-the-horizon ranges. These long range challenges underscore the demands on the submarine force to meet their growing and increasing scopes of responsibilities.

World War II submarine operations paved the way for most of today’s submarine missions. Today’s American submarine force is one of the most capable forces in the world and the history of U.S. Navy, comprising 53 fast attack submarines, 14 ballistic-missile submarines and four guided-missile submarines. The existing fleet of ballistic submarines currently carries 54 percent of our nation’s nuclear deterrent arsenal, and their replacements will carry an even greater percentage of strategic warheads.

There are three major types of submarines in the United States Navy: ballistic missile submarines, attack submarines, and cruise missile submarines. All submarines in the U.S. Navy are nuclear-powered. Ballistic missile submarines have a single strategic mission of carrying nuclear submarine-launched ballistic missiles. Attack submarines have several tactical missions, including sinking ships and subs, launching cruise missiles, and gathering intelligence.

Hope you enjoy!!

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What does the U.S. Submarine fleet comprise of?

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Submarine Fleet Strength by Country (2020) Military Power Comparison 3D



Total Submarine Strength by Country
Submarine Fleet Strength by Country (2020)
Submarine Comparison
Military Power Comparison
#Submarine #Comparison
Total submarine fleet strength by naval power.

The modern attack submarine is capable of sea- and land-attack through conventional and nuclear means. Beyond their most obvious uses, submarines can be used in support of special forces operations and reconnaissance work. Many modern world navies utilize the submarine, primarily as a deterrent element in territorial waters with most modern, notable forces keeping a standard fleet of about five or more boats.

Total Submarine Strength by Country – Military Power Comparison 2020

Submarine Fleet Strength by Country (2020) Military Power Comparison

Music: Kevin MacLeod – Chee Zee Cave – Video Classica
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INSIDE The Nuclear Fast Attack Submarine USS COLUMBIA (SSN-771)



For years at a time, man and woman of the US Navy’s “Silent Service” live on board the world’s most advanced boats…fast-attack nuclear submarines! In this video, I take you on a personal tour of the fast-attack submarine USS Columbia (SSN-771) known as the “Last Slider”. Time is money on these warships so we had to film in just one take! Special Thanks to the men of the USS Columbia!

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This work, Touring USS Columbia (SSN 771), by PO2 Johans Chavarro, was provided and approved by the U.S. Department of Defense.

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