US Navy transforms Arctic ice slab into an AIRSTRIP and military camp with its own cafeteria and internet


THE US Navy has developed an ‘ice camp’ on a sheet of floating ice in the Arctic Ocean where Sailors could experience temperatures down to -60 degrees Fahrenheit.

To service a three-week program called Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2022, the Navy built Ice Camp Queenfish on an ice floe about 175 miles off the coast of Alaska in just a few days.

Ice Camp Queenfish can support over 60 personnel

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Ice Camp Queenfish can support over 60 personnelCredit: Commander, Submarine Force Atlan
The ice camp's runway was built on smooth first-year ice

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The ice camp’s runway was built on smooth first-year iceCredit: MC1 Alfred Coffield/U.S. Navy

Ice Camp Queenfish is complete with a command center, sleeping quarters, cafeteria, restrooms, internet, and even a 2,500-foot-long runway that supports multiple daily flights.

“Although the ice camp and airstrip are built in just a few days, it takes a tremendous amount of practice, planning, and hard work by many highly trained people ahead of time to be successful,” said Rear Admiral Richard Seif, the ranking officer at ICEX 2022.

ICEX 2022 allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic by pushing Sailors to learn and experience the environment while developing relationships with other services and allies.

The ice camp is being used to test out “submarine systems and other arctic research initiatives,” according to the Navy’s press release.

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The runway was built on smooth first-year ice. To prepare the snow for the ice camp runway, the team used all-terrain vehicles, cultivators, disc rakes, and snowblowers.

Not only can the encampment be built in about five days, but it can be flexible if necessary.

The tents that house and support over 60 personnel working at the site are made up of aluminum, carbon fiber, or inflated beams.

The frigid camp wouldn’t be possible without intense research by the Navy’s team of meteorologist specialists, which Navy Lieutenant Seth Koenig called the “first line of defense between the vulnerable ice camp personnel and those dangerous conditions.”

The four-person meteorological team works closely with scientists to use satellite technology and forecasting equipment to stay aware of the constantly-changing environment.

The team works to monitor ice fractures, as well as future temperatures, windchills, and currents in order to guide traveling flights and advise the personnel in outdoor training and research.

“Because it’s a data sparse environment, weather can change really quickly,” Lieutenant Colleen Wilmington, the team’s leader, said.

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“Right now we’re pushing to forecast out about 36 hours, but beyond that, it’s really difficult. It’s really a matter of looking at it constantly and using as much available data as possible to get a look at what’s going on.”

This ice camp training comes as US Army soldiers have been undergoing parachute training at a crucial Alaska base.

Ice Camp Queenfish is complete with sleeping quarters

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Ice Camp Queenfish is complete with sleeping quartersCredit: MC1 Alfred Coffield/U.S. Navy
The ice camp is being used to test out submarine systems

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The ice camp is being used to test out submarine systemsCredit: Commander, Submarine Force Atlan
A team of meteorological specialists research the intense Arctic conditions

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A team of meteorological specialists research the intense Arctic conditionsCredit: Mike Demello/U.S. Navy

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Latest US military hypersonic test fails


A booster stack, which is the rocket used to accelerate the projectile to hypersonic speeds, failed and the test of the projectile, the hypersonic glide body, could not proceed, the statement said.

Because the rocket failed the Pentagon was not able to test the hypersonic glide body, which is the key component needed to develop a hypersonic weapon.

Officials have started a review of the test, which took place Thursday at the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska, to understand the cause of the booster failure.

“Experiments and tests — both successful and unsuccessful — are the backbone of developing highly complex, critical technologies at tremendous speed, as the department is doing with hypersonic technologies,” said Lt. Cdr. Tim Gorman, a Pentagon spokesman, in a statement.

The Pentagon has made developing hypersonic weapons one of its top priorities, particularly as China and Russia are working to develop their own versions. The failure is another blow to the US effort following a failed test in April and comes days after it was reported that China had successfully tested a hypersonic glide vehicle.

Traveling at Mach 5 or faster, hypersonic weapons are difficult to detect, posing a challenge to missile defense systems. Hypersonic missiles can travel at a far lower trajectory than high-arcing ballistic missiles, which can be easily detectable. Hypersonics can also maneuver and evade missile defense systems.

Reports of successful Chinese and Russian test

Over the weekend, the Financial Times reported that China had successfully tested a hypersonic glide vehicle capable of carrying a nuclear weapon. They reported the glide vehicle was launched from an orbital bombardment system. Though China denied the report, saying on Monday that the test was instead a “routine spacecraft experiment.

Defense officials say they are particulary concerned about China developing hypersonic capabilities because they could enable Beijing to launch an attack over the South Pole, evading US missile defenses, which are generally geared toward missiles coming over the North Pole.

Two weeks ago, Russia claimed to have successfully tested a submarine-launched hypersonic missile for the first time, dubbed the Tsirkon. Earlier this summer, Russia said it had fired the same missile from a warship.

Nevertheless, the Pentagon insists it remains on track to deliver offensive hypersonic weapons in the early 2020s, a timeline that seems more urgent with the advances in hypersonic technology shown off by the Russians and Chinese.

“This flight test is part of an ongoing series of flight tests as we continue to develop this technology,” Gorman said.

The failed test of a hypersonic glide body occurred after the Navy and Army earlier this week conducted a series of successful hypersonic measurement tests highlighting the Pentagon’s priority of rapidly researching and testing the weapon system. The three joint sounding tests were designed to collect data and carry out hypersonic experiments from DoD partners involved in developing the advanced weapons.

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“These launches allow for frequent and regular flight testing opportunities to support rapid maturation of offensive and defensive hypersonic technologies,” the Navy said in a statement about the trials.

Those tests, carried out at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, provide data for the development of the services’ hypersonic weapons, including the Navy’s Conventional Prompt Strike and the Army’s Long Range Hypersonic Weapon.

The US is focusing on conventional hypersonic weapons that are based on ships, land and air platforms.

In April, the Air Force’s hypersonic missile program suffered a setback when it failed to launch from a B-52. Instead, the AGM-183A Air-launched Rapid Response Weapon (ARRW) remained on the aircraft.



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Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice



Video: Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice

The Los Angeles class fast-attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) surfacing in the Arctic Ocean in support of Ice Exercise (ICEX). ICEX is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations.
(U.S. Navy video by Chief Darryl I. Wood/Released)

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The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of



The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of

While nuclear power seems for many to be a fairly modern innovation, research on nuclear marine propulsion started way back in the 1940’s. In fact, the first nuclear-powered submarine took its maiden voyage in 1955. Since then, the tech, range, power and capabilities of these nuclear vessels have improved exponentially. So, what is the latest in the world of nuclear-powered marine vessels and what can we predict on the horizon?

In this episode we are going to learn all about the latest generation of nuclear-powered ships and take a guess on what leaps we’ll make in the future.

So, let’s get into it!

#Submarine #US #Navy

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US Submarine Commander Rates 14 Submarine Scenes In Movies | How Real Is It?



Former US submarine commander L. David Marquet rated the realism of submarine scenes in popular movies, judging their technological accuracy as well as the depiction of life on board.

Marquet addresses the realism of nuclear crisis movies, such as “The World Is Not Enough” and “K-19: The Widowmaker,”. He also rated the accuracy of standoff scenes in “The Hunt for Red October,” “The Enemy Below”, “Hunter Killer,” and “Crimson Tide.” He also breaks down the realism of costumes, tactics, and terminology from “U-571.”

Is life on board a submarine, including confined conditions and drills, as depicted in “Das Boot”? Would Navy SEALs enter a submarine from a HALO drop similar to “Act of Valor”, and is it possible for a submarine to hear music from the water’s surface, like in  “The Wolf’s Call”? Can holes on a submarine be plugged with pins and other metal objects, as we see in “The Simpsons”? Would nuclear missiles be triggered by dislodging in a ship interior, such as in “Aquaman”?

Marquet graduated top of his class from the US Naval Academy and served for 28 years on submarines, including as an engineer officer aboard the USS Will Rogers, then as captain on the USS Olympia and the USS Santa Fe. Having retired in 2009, he is now a Wall Street Journal best-selling author of “Turn the Ship Around! A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders.”

MORE HOW REAL IS IT? VIDEOS:
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US Submarine Commander Rates 14 Submarine Scenes In Movies | How Real Is It?

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What's Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy



Video: What’s Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy

The Ohio Class submarine is the fourth biggest in the world. The US Navy operates 18 Ohio class nuclear-powered submarines, which are the biggest submarines ever built for the US. Each sub has a submerged displacement of 18,750t.

The first submarine of the class, USS Ohio was built by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton. It was commissioned into service in November 1981. All the other submarines were named after the US States, except USS Henry M. Jackson, which was named after a US senator.

Each Ohio Class submarine has a length of 170m, a 13m beam and a 10.8m draught. The gliding speed on the surface is 12kt and underwater is 20kt. The submarine class includes one S8G pressurised water reactor, two geared turbines, one auxiliary 242kW diesel motor and one shaft with a seven-bladed screw.

The submarine is capable of carrying 24 Trident missiles. The armament also includes four 53cm Mark 48 torpedo tubes.

Video by Austin Rooney, Petty Officer 1st Class Jeffrey Richardson, Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Hinton, Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Lee
#usmilitarynews #americanpatriot #usmilitary

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Life at Sea: Navy Submarine



Life at sea on a submarine is unlike anything else on earth. It’s a hidden moving missile silo and for Sailors on a mission, it’s home:

Submariners are highly knowledgeable, skilled engineers and technicians who thrive when challenged. With an air of relentless positivity, they keep our shores safe as the unseen defenders of the deep.

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Fast Attack Submarine Operations At Naval Base Guam (2020)



U.S. Navy, Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15 (CSS-15), transit Apra Harbor, moor pierside and depart Naval Base Guam during operations in 2020. CSS-15 currently consists of four Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines: USS Key West, SSN 722 — USS Oklahoma City, SSN 723 — USS Topeka, SSN 754 — USS Asheville, SSN 758.

Film Credits: U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger and Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jordyn Diomede, Commander Submarine Squadron 15

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WOW- A U.S. SUBMARINE REALY SMASHED INTO AN -UNDERSEA MOUNTAIN #WARTHOGDEFENSE



In 2005, a U.S. Navy nuclear submarine ran aground on a mountain. No, it wasn’t out of the water—it hit an underground mountain, and nearly sank.

The USS San Francisco is an American nuclear powered submarine, one of the large Los Angeles-class submarines first laid down in 1972 and are among the U.S. Navy’s quietest submarines.

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Warthog Defense members are sharing stories, insider tips, news from the front lines, and unique slices of military life including the tough stuff of war.

Warthog Defense provides headline news and technology updates since our community answers the call and makes news. We also cover the rest of the military experience —and in our military equipment guide we present what makes the military unique (and fun).

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