SASC Leader Supports Maintaining Nuclear Programs


JUST IN: Senate Leader Supports Maintaining Nuclear Triad Budget


2/24/2021


By
Meredith Roaten

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile, a B-2 bomber and the Ohio-class submarine USS Tennessee

Photos: Defense Dept.

The Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., said he supports maintaining current budget levels for the nuclear triad, but he expects the overall defense budget to flatten.

The newly appointed chairman of the SASC said he supported fully funding the three legs of the triad — ground-based intercontinental ballistic missiles, long-range bombers and ballistic missile submarines — he told reporters at a Defense Writers Group event Feb. 23.

“We have to modernize the triad and maintain in my view the triad for strategic reasons that have been successful for about 70 years,” he said.

He noted the B-21 aircraft for the Air Force and Columbia-class boomers for the Navy specifically need to be monitored to stay within cost parameters. Both systems would replace aging weapon systems that are rapidly approaching their retirement dates, some time over the next decade or so.

The senator did not address calls from some members of his party to reduce or delay the ground-based strategic deterrent that will replace the Air Force’s Minuteman III.

“But in every one of these areas, we can’t avoid looking at cost and trying to minimize those costs,” Reed said.

Reed added that the defense budget will likely increase at a slower rate from the Trump administration years.

He would not prioritize considering cuts to the Air Force’s F-35A joint strike fighter jet program, but that he would look at analyzing the high costs and reliability issues that have been a target of critics. The service plans on buying 1,763 aircraft.

“I think we have to make sure that we send the right signal, but also don’t compromise the operations of the Air Force,” he said.

Congress also has to be wary of how cutting equipment would impact the defense industrial base, Reed noted. Final decisions will be made once the committee is able to weigh all these factors, he said.

Though Reed supports the push for modernization, he said there may be cuts to legacy weapons systems. Senators such as Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., have pushed for dramatic budget cuts, but the slim Democratic majority in the Senate means dramatic changes in either direction are likely off the table, Reed said.

Congress passed a more than $700 billion budget for defense for the 2021 fiscal year.  “We’re going to deal with, I think, a much tighter budget going forward, more flat, then rising,” he said. “But within that, I think we have to make judicious calls about what is worthwhile.”

He acknowledged that individual senators often have vested interests in legacy systems, which make cuts challenging.

Functional cost savings could help the defense work within a tighter budget, he said, while mentioning privatizing military commissaries as one example of a way to save on expenses without touching investment for weapons. A majority Republican Senate defeated a proposal to pilot private commissaries in 2016 after a study was commissioned to assess the costs and benefits of the program in 2015.

Meanwhile, Reed addressed opposition from Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., to the nomination of Colin Kahl, Biden’s pick for the undersecretary of defense for policy.

A spokesperson for Inhofe told POLITICO that the senator has issues with some of Kahl’s policy positions. The news outlet reported Republican criticism of Kahl’s support of the deal with Iran, or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Reed said he trusted the hearing process and hoped Kahl would have a chance to defend his positions and his experience during questioning next week, March 4. Kahl’s long-standing relationship with President Joe Biden would help the Defense Department build a strong relationship with the White House, Reed added.

“I think he’ll get a fair shot at the hearing,” he said.

The senator added that the committee will “aggressively” pursue the 59 nominations slated for the Defense Department. The lack of a “real transition” to the Biden administration put the department at a disadvantage that needs to be corrected, Reed said.

“We’ve made the point that we need the nominees as quickly as possible … particularly after the last several years of the Trump administration, with the department really in disarray, acting secretaries and people acting for acting secretary,” he said. “So we’ve got to get back to stability.”


Topics: Acquisition, Advanced Weapons



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Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice



Video: Rescue Of Gigantic $2 Billion US Nuclear Submarines Gets Stuck in Ice

The Los Angeles class fast-attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) surfacing in the Arctic Ocean in support of Ice Exercise (ICEX). ICEX is a five-week exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations.
(U.S. Navy video by Chief Darryl I. Wood/Released)

#usmilitarynews #americanpatriot #usmilitary

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The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of



The US Built A New Submarine The World Is Afraid Of

While nuclear power seems for many to be a fairly modern innovation, research on nuclear marine propulsion started way back in the 1940’s. In fact, the first nuclear-powered submarine took its maiden voyage in 1955. Since then, the tech, range, power and capabilities of these nuclear vessels have improved exponentially. So, what is the latest in the world of nuclear-powered marine vessels and what can we predict on the horizon?

In this episode we are going to learn all about the latest generation of nuclear-powered ships and take a guess on what leaps we’ll make in the future.

So, let’s get into it!

#Submarine #US #Navy

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What's Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy



Video: What’s Inside The Largest Nuclear Submarines in The U.S. Navy

The Ohio Class submarine is the fourth biggest in the world. The US Navy operates 18 Ohio class nuclear-powered submarines, which are the biggest submarines ever built for the US. Each sub has a submerged displacement of 18,750t.

The first submarine of the class, USS Ohio was built by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton. It was commissioned into service in November 1981. All the other submarines were named after the US States, except USS Henry M. Jackson, which was named after a US senator.

Each Ohio Class submarine has a length of 170m, a 13m beam and a 10.8m draught. The gliding speed on the surface is 12kt and underwater is 20kt. The submarine class includes one S8G pressurised water reactor, two geared turbines, one auxiliary 242kW diesel motor and one shaft with a seven-bladed screw.

The submarine is capable of carrying 24 Trident missiles. The armament also includes four 53cm Mark 48 torpedo tubes.

Video by Austin Rooney, Petty Officer 1st Class Jeffrey Richardson, Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Hinton, Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Lee
#usmilitarynews #americanpatriot #usmilitary

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Boarding a US NAVY NUCLEAR SUBMARINE in the Arctic – Smarter Every Day 240



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Note: The US Navy put no restrictions on me about what I should say or how I should present what I learned on this trip. Other than making sure my footage was cleared for Operational Security, I am free to say whatever I want about this experience.

Another note: The Navy did not ask me to provide a link to their website (or do anything for that matter), but I’m going to provide a link because I want smart people to become submariners. The US Navy continues to provide stability and security in ways no other organization on earth does. If you are interested to find out how you can join the Navy you can visit the website here:
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There are tons of interesting career opportunities out there that I never knew about:

The US Navy has several options such as engineer, pilot, submariner, logistics, accountant, medical doctor, and even Public Affairs specialist. I continue to be impressed by people that I meed who spent time in the Navy. I worked with various people during the course of filming this video and they were all top notch.
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❓Mystery Item (just for fun):

📷Camera I use :
Wide-angle:
My Multi-tool:
💾How I get footage off my phone:
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Everyone needs a snatchblock:
🥽Goggle Up! :

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How I Boarded a US NAVY NUCLEAR SUBMARINE in the Arctic (ICEX 2020) – Smarter Every Day 237



Get 1st Audiobook + access to monthly selection of Audible Originals for free when you try Audible for 30 days or TXT smarter to 500500

Upcoming videos will explore what life on a submarine is like. Click here if you want to sub 😏:
⇊ Click below for more links! ⇊

Note: The US Navy put no restrictions on me about what I should say or how I should present what I learned on this trip. Other than making sure my footage was cleared for Operational Security, I am free to say whatever I want about this experience.

Even though things are getting a bit difficult, The US Navy continues to provide stability and security. If you are interested to find out how you can join the Navy you can visit the website here:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
GET SMARTER SECTION

There are tons of interesting career opportunities out there that I never knew about:

The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks offers incredible opportunities to research Arctic regions. They OWN A ROCKET RANGE. They do things like predict Aurora and monitor seismic and volcanic activity. I wish I knew about this when I was younger.

Check out the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

The US Navy has several options such as engineer, pilot, submariner, logistics, accountant, medical doctor, and even Public Affairs specialist. I continue to be impressed by people that I meed who spent time in the Navy. I worked with various people during the course of filming this video and they were all top notch.

I asked Sofia to write a little blurb about her job experience: Sofia Montalvo is an Ice Analyst at the US National Ice Center (USNIC). She studied meteorology at the University of Miami and atmospheric science at North Carolina State University, but did not know that mapping and forecasting sea ice for safety and navigation was a thing she could do. She loves her job for the mission it upholds: The USNIC Operations Department Analysts use remote sensing and model data to produce hemispheric, regional, and tailored ice and snow analyses. The Operations department is committed to the safety of navigation, protection of life and property, and government scientific research.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
GET STUFF SECTION:

(If I did this right these should be working Amazon affiliate links to purchase the stuff I like to use. When people purchase from these links it will support Smarter Every Day.)

❓Mystery Item (just for fun):

Alaska Gear:
Ski Goggles:
Level 1 Thermal :
Level 2 Pullover:
Level 2 Bottoms:
Level 7 Pants:
Balaclava:
Boots:
Socks:
Parka: (got mine used off Ebay)
Gloves: Shell & Liner made by “The Heat Company” (no amazon links)

Also, if you’re interested in a Smarter Every Day shirt etc. they’re really soft and you can get there here:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tweet Ideas to me at:

Smarter Every Day on Facebook

Smarter Every Day on Patreon

Smarter Every Day On Instagram

Smarter Every Day SubReddit

Ambiance, audio and musicy things by: Gordon McGladdery

If you feel like this video was worth your time and added value to your life, please SHARE THE VIDEO!

If you REALLY liked it, feel free to pitch a few dollars Smarter Every Day by becoming a Patron.

Warm Regards,

Destin

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US Navy Nuclear Submarine Crashes Through Polar Ice



U.S. Navy nuclear submarines USS Hartford (SSN 768) and USS Connecticut (SSN 22) surfacing in the Arctic Ocean for Ice Exercise (ICEX).

During ICEX, Navy submarines would conduct Arctic transits in which they would surface and break the ice (usually 60-90 cm or 2–3 feet thick), collect data, and run other training exercise to gain experience working in the Arctic.

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Credit: Darryl Wood | AiirSource Military Channel

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Nuclear-Powered Fast Attack Submarine Virginia-Class ⚔️ US Navy [Review]



The Virginia class, also known as the SSN-774 class, is a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines in service with the United States Navy.
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Virginia-class #Submarines are designed for a broad spectrum of open-ocean and littoral missions. They were conceived as a less expensive alternative to the Seawolf-class attack submarines, designed during the Cold War era. They are replacing older Los Angeles-class submarines, many of which have already been decommissioned. Virginia-class submarines will be acquired through 2043, and are expected to remain in service past 2060. Based on recent updates to the designs, some of the Virginia-class submarines are expected to still be in service in 2070.

SPECIFICATIONS

Name: Virginia
Type: Nuclear attack submarine
Operators: United States #Navy
Preceded by: Seawolf class
Cost: $2.688 billion per unit (FY2016)
Built: 2000–present
In commission: 2004–present
Building: 5
Planned: 48
Completed: 16
Active: 14

Builders:
General Dynamics Electric Boat
Newport News Shipbuilding

Length: 114.91 m
Beam: 10.36 m
Displacement: 7,900 t

Payload:
40 weapons, special operations forces, unmanned undersea vehicles, Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS)

Propulsion:
The S9G nuclear reactor delivering 40,000 shaft horse power. Nuclear core life estimated at 33 years.

Test depth:
greater than 240 m, allegedly around 490 m.

Complement: 135 (15:120)

Speed:
Greater than 46 km/h allegedly up to 65 km/h

Range: unlimited

Endurance:
Only limited by food and maintenance requirements.

Planned cost:
about US$1.65 billion each (based on FY95 dollars, 30-boat class and two boat/year build-rate)

Actual cost:
US$1.5 billion (in 1994 prices), US$2.6 billion (in 2012 prices)

Annual operating cost: $50 million per unit
Crew: 120 enlisted and 14 officers

Armament:
Block I-IV:
12 × VLS (Tomahawk BGM-109) tubes
4 × 533 mm torpedo tubes (Mk-48 torpedo)
37 × torpedoes & missiles (torpedo room)

Block V:
VPM module (28 Tomahawk BGM-109)
12 × VLS (Tomahawk BGM-109) tubes
4 × 533 mm torpedo tubes (Mk-48 torpedo)
65 × torpedoes & missiles

Decoys: Acoustic Device Countermeasure Mk 3/4
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We are sure, that all the fans of #MilitaryWeapons will find here something related to their interests.
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Remember that these are not toys 🙂
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Music Info:
“Arctic Expedition – Martin Baekkevold” belongs to and was used under license for the company Scalelab

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A Rare Look Inside US Navy Nuclear Submarine USS Texas



USS Texas (SSN-775) is a Virginia-class nuclear-powered fast-attack submarine, and the fourth warship of the United States Navy to be named after the state of Texas.

The video includes footages of Sailors onboard the submarine perform routine maintenance and daily operations in the auxiliary spaces and the conning tower, prepare the submarine to dive while underway, and fire drill during a routine training exercise in the Pacific Ocean.

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