U.S. NAVY SUBMARINE HISTORY & TRAINING DOCUMENTARY FILM 1900-1954 "TAKE 'ER DOWN" 21384



Made in 1954 as the U.S. Navy entered the nuclear submarine era, “Take ‘Er Down” celebrates the history of the submarine. At :55, the new submarine USS Nautilus is shown on the launching ways. At 1:10 the Navy’s first diesel submarine USS Holland is shown in operation. At 1:28 the L and K class boats of WWI are shown, and then R and S class boats. At 1:57 the outbreak of WWII at Pearl Harbor is shown, and then a brief history of the submarine force operating in the Pacific from 1942-1945. As torpedoes wreak havoc on Japanese shipping, various improvements are shown including new radar and sonar, and improved silent electric torpedoes. At 3:20 training simulation is seen. At 4:20 some of the benefits of serving in the “Silent Service” are shown including great food, camaraderie, and of course no showers for weeks at sea. At 5:00 Navy psychologists assess potential crewmembers. At 5:22 the submarine school at New London is shown. At 6:40 drills are shown at sea including crash diving. At 8:13 the escape training tower is shown. At 8:25 newly minted submariners arrive on their new boat. At 8:40 the USS Spinax radar picket boat is shown. At 8:55 USS Tunny (actually probably USS Cusk) is shown launching a V-1 rocket. At 9:09 the K1, a hunter-killer boat, is shown. At 9:24 a submarine makes an emergency surface. At 9:37 the USS Perch with an amphibious hangar on the rear of the sub is shown. At 9:45 a helicopter takes off from Perch as part of work with the UDTs. At 9:57 the UDT assault party is shown. At 11:04 the Balao class USS Cubera SS-347 is shown after GUPPY class conversion. At 11:10 a snorkel is shown in operation allowing running of the diesels without surfacing. At 11:30 an atomic bomb explodes as part of Operation Crossroads. Now the nuclear submarine USS Nautilus is shown at 11:50. The submarine harnesses the power of the atom.

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Submarine Torpedo Attack Training (And Harpoon Missle Launched During Same Exercise To Sink Ship)



Submarine Torpedo Attack Training (plus a separate UGM-84 Harpoon missile launched during the same “RIMPAC” training exercise to Sink Ship).

This remarkable video contains two pieces of footage from same “RIMPAC” event—taken from inside a United States Navy Los Angeles-class fast attack sub, and from the air—details the preparation, loading, and launch of an anti-ship missile, and also shows a conventional torpedo striking the training target/decommissioned navy vessel.

Official release: PACIFIC OCEAN (July 12, 2018) Sailors assigned to Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) prepare to launch a UGM-84 Harpoon missile during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) training exercise to sink the decommissioned ex-USS Racine (LST-1191) July 12 off the coast of Hawaii. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 – Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security of the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

Credit: Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Lee, USN.

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